Impact Matters: sharing research with a public and patient audience

Involving the public in our research is of huge importance to us. We recently held an event that was dedicated to sharing research findings, and ways to get involved.

Scientific research around NIHR Newcastle Biomedical Research Centre’s (BRC) key themes would not be possible without the public, and this event provided updates to ongoing research for those who made such research possible.

The event was introduced by Dr Lynne Corner, Director of Engagement in the Faculty of Medical Sciences and Patient and Public Involvement Lead with Newcastle BRC. She opened up a series of presentations on ‘Involving the Public in Research’

The first speaker, Professor Doug Turnbull, Mitochondria and Neuromuscular Disease Theme Lead for NIHR Newcastle BRC. He discussed the role that public and patients played in helping to pass a law that allows for the use of IVF techniques, bringing in third parent DNA to new babies so as to avoid passing on mitochondrial through generations.

Professor Paula Moynihan then presented her experience of influencing the World Health Organisation on global sugar intake. She made reference to how our health system gives voice to patients and allows us all to be involved in changing the landscape of our healthcare.

Before the break for lunch, we heard from NIHR PPI Peer Reviewer, Dave Green. He spoke about his experience of being a member of the public who plays a crucial role within a research team. He discussed how vital it is in the research process to be able to ‘test evidence against experience’, something that patient and public participation makes possible.

The audience then became part of the event when Dr Pauline Addis, Research and Impact Officer with the Faculty of Medical Sciences led a group discussion on topics related to the public’s participation. At this time, members of the audience were able to put questions forward to all speakers.

After lunch, Dr Mark Jarvis discussed impact from a research point of view, giving us the broader context of the NIHR infrastructure.

Professor Richard Thomson gave some examples of patient public and involvement and to end, Professor Julia Newton delivered a case study of a patient’s journey tackling fatigue as a side effect of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC).

The event was closed by Dr Lynne Corner who facilitated another round of questions before thanking speakers and the audience.

Scientific research around NIHR Newcastle Biomedical Research Centre’s (BRC) key themes would not be possible without the public, and this event provided updates to ongoing research for those who made such research possible.

For this reason, we work closely with a public audience to ensure that they are regularly informed on all of our activity so that they understand the value of their participation, as well as being able to shape future research ideas.

An event held 2016 entitled: ‘Patient and Public Matters’ was designed specifically for this interaction. The goal was to summarise various strands of public involvement in NIHR Newcastle Biomedical Research Centre activity.

The event was introduced by Dr Lynne Corner, Director of Engagement in the Faculty of Medical Sciences and Patient and Public Involvement Lead with Newcastle BRC. She opened up a series of presentations on ‘Involving the Public in Research’.

Professor Doug Turnbull, Neuromuscular Disease Theme Lead for NIHR Newcastle BRC also addressed the public audience. He discussed the role that public and patients played in helping to pass a law that allows for the use of IVF techniques, bringing in third parent DNA to new babies so as to avoid passing on mitochondrial through generations.

Professor Paula Moynihan discussed her experience of influencing the World Health Organisation on global sugar intake. She made reference to how our health system gives voice to patients and allows us all to be involved in changing the landscape of our healthcare.

Before the break for lunch, we heard from NIHR PPI Peer Reviewer, Dave Green. He spoke about his experience of being a member of the public who plays a crucial role within a research team. He discussed how vital it is in the research process to be able to ‘test evidence against experience’, something that patient and public participation makes possible.

The audience then became part of the event when Dr Pauline Addis, Research and Impact Officer with the Faculty of Medical Sciences led a group discussion on topics related to the public’s participation. At this time, members of the audience were able to put questions forward to all speakers.

After lunch, Dr Mark Jarvis discussed impact from a research point of view, giving us the broader context of the NIHR infrastructure.

Professor Richard Thomson gave some examples of patient public and involvement and to end, Professor Julia Newton delivered a case study of a patient’s journey tackling fatigue as a side effect of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC).

The event was closed by Dr Lynne Corner who facilitated another round of questions before thanking speakers and the audience.

We’re committed to sharing ongoing research with our public and patient audience and this event is only a small fraction of what we do to engage and incorporate public voices in our activity.

Scientific research around NIHR Newcastle Biomedical Research Centre’s (BRC) key themes would not be possible without the public, and this event provided updates to ongoing research for those who made such research possible.

The event was introduced by Dr Lynne Corner, Director of Engagement in the Faculty of Medical Sciences and Patient and Public Involvement Lead with Newcastle BRC. She opened up a series of presentations on ‘Involving the Public in Research’

The first speaker, Professor Doug Turnbull, Mitochondria and Neuromuscular Disease Theme Lead for NIHR Newcastle BRC. He discussed the role that public and patients played in helping to pass a law that allows for the use of IVF techniques, bringing in third parent DNA to new babies so as to avoid passing on mitochondrial through generations.

Professor Paula Moynihan then presented her experience of influencing the World Health Organisation on global sugar intake. She made reference to how our health system gives voice to patients and allows us all to be involved in changing the landscape of our healthcare.

Before the break for lunch, we heard from NIHR PPI Peer Reviewer, Dave Green. He spoke about his experience of being a member of the public who plays a crucial role within a research team. He discussed how vital it is in the research process to be able to ‘test evidence against experience’, something that patient and public participation makes possible.

The audience then became part of the event when Dr Pauline Addis, Research and Impact Officer with the Faculty of Medical Sciences led a group discussion on topics related to the public’s participation. At this time, members of the audience were able to put questions forward to all speakers.

After lunch, Dr Mark Jarvis discussed impact from a research point of view, giving us the broader context of the NIHR infrastructure.

Professor Richard Thomson gave some examples of patient public and involvement and to end, Professor Julia Newton delivered a case study of a patient’s journey tackling fatigue as a side effect of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC).

The event was closed by Dr Lynne Corner who facilitated another round of questions before thanking speakers and the audience.

Scientific research around NIHR Newcastle Biomedical Research Centre’s (BRC) key themes would not be possible without the public, and this event provided updates to ongoing research for those who made such research possible.

The event was introduced by Dr Lynne Corner, Director of Engagement in the Faculty of Medical Sciences and Patient and Public Involvement Lead with Newcastle BRC. She opened up a series of presentations on ‘Involving the Public in Research’

The first speaker, Professor Doug Turnbull, Mitochondria and Neuromuscular Disease Theme Lead for NIHR Newcastle BRC. He discussed the role that public and patients played in helping to pass a law that allows for the use of IVF techniques, bringing in third parent DNA to new babies so as to avoid passing on mitochondrial through generations.

Professor Paula Moynihan then presented her experience of influencing the World Health Organisation on global sugar intake. She made reference to how our health system gives voice to patients and allows us all to be involved in changing the landscape of our healthcare.

Before the break for lunch, we heard from NIHR PPI Peer Reviewer, Dave Green. He spoke about his experience of being a member of the public who plays a crucial role within a research team. He discussed how vital it is in the research process to be able to ‘test evidence against experience’, something that patient and public participation makes possible.

The audience then became part of the event when Dr Pauline Addis, Research and Impact Officer with the Faculty of Medical Sciences led a group discussion on topics related to the public’s participation. At this time, members of the audience were able to put questions forward to all speakers.

After lunch, Dr Mark Jarvis discussed impact from a research point of view, giving us the broader context of the NIHR infrastructure.

Professor Richard Thomson gave some examples of patient public and involvement and to end, Professor Julia Newton delivered a case study of a patient’s journey tackling fatigue as a side effect of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC).

The event was closed by Dr Lynne Corner who facilitated another round of questions before thanking speakers and the audience.